Jennifer Lynn Barnes

Newly minted PhD, professor, pop culture junkie, voracious reader, and author of the Raised By Wolves series, Every Other Day, Nobody, and More

New author photos! Courtesy of the lovely Kim Haynes.

The Originals

I’m a sucker for sibling stories. And also extra-powerful-sixteen-year-olds and werewolves-who-find-family-in-unexpected-places and psychologists-who-hang-out-with-vampires (the tropes I love, they are VERY SPECIFIC).

Long story short, THE ORIGINALS was pretty much made for me. This week’s episode was my favorite so far!

Before the Episode:

DURING THE EPISODE:

After the Episode:

I totally re-watched both of the Elijah scenes. And also, I am still holding out hope for the HAYLEY + REBEKAH BFF SLUMBER PARTY.



sarahreesbrennan:

izabella:

BUT GUYS HAS ANYONE FANCAST BILL SKARSGÅRD AS JARED LYNBURN YET?!?!

I have not seen that fancast before but I am open to it. I have watched Hemlock Grove and was like ‘Eric from True Blood’s little brother is a vampire! My first clue was that he was Eric from True Blood’s little brother, and my second clue was how much he liked blood.’
… Maureen Johnson has penned several fine songs about Hemlock Grove. If any of you ever meet her, you should ask her to sing them.

Reblogging this to say that Maureen’sHemlock Grove songs are a WORK OF ART. Half of the point of watching Hemlock Grove is the anticipation of the song Maureen will sing you once the episode is finished. (Complete with guitar strumming). 

sarahreesbrennan:

izabella:

BUT GUYS HAS ANYONE FANCAST BILL SKARSGÅRD AS JARED LYNBURN YET?!?!

I have not seen that fancast before but I am open to it. I have watched Hemlock Grove and was like ‘Eric from True Blood’s little brother is a vampire! My first clue was that he was Eric from True Blood’s little brother, and my second clue was how much he liked blood.’

… Maureen Johnson has penned several fine songs about Hemlock Grove. If any of you ever meet her, you should ask her to sing them.

Reblogging this to say that Maureen’sHemlock Grove songs are a WORK OF ART. Half of the point of watching Hemlock Grove is the anticipation of the song Maureen will sing you once the episode is finished. (Complete with guitar strumming). 

UK Cover Reveal: THE NATURALS

Today is the official cover reveal for the UK edition of THE NATURALS. As some of you might remember, I did my Masters degree in England, so I am always so excited to know that my  books have found a wonderful publishing home with Quercus on that side of the pond!

What do you think? I love how tough Cassie looks (and yet, hidden vulnerability!). It’s interesting to me how different the US and UK covers are, and yet I LOVE THEM BOTH.

You can also check out what UK reviewers are saying about THE NATURALS:

I loved Jennifer Lynn Barne’s previous YA series about werewolves and I loved how her background in psychology gave the story this added depth… and I was sure that I would love The Naturals just as much. And you know what? I did. More so, even. ” - Fluttering Butterflies 

"…this is the best YA novel I have read for a long time. It was so exciting and so unique that I couldn’t stop turning page after page." - She Loves to Read

We are, as a species, addicted to story. Even when the body goes to sleep, the mind stays up all night, telling itself stories.

Jonathan Gottschall, The Storytelling Animal: How Stories Make Us Human  (via thatkindofwoman)

***

This is an excellent book! I teach parts of it in both my Cognitive Science of Fiction class and my Writing Young Adult Novels class. Definitely worth a read if you are interested in the science of story!

(Source: revnaomiking, via bethrevis)

Paperback Writer: Bitten to Air on Syfy US

melissamarr:

kelleyarmstrong:

Syfy in the US has picked up the Bitten TV show. That story is here. It seems they’re airing it next year, as is Space in Canada. I don’t know if that’s still scheduled for January or if it’ll be simultaneous releases etc. If you want to know when my next book comes out, I know that. Everything…

Please join me in sending huge congrats to my sometimes-co-author, sometimes-co-editor, and always friend Kelley! 

Since the WOMEN OF THE OTHERWORLD is one of my all-time favorite books series (and Kelley one of my very favorite authors), I am hugely excited (from an entirely selfish perspective) that the show will be airing in the U.S.!

I am also super psyched for Kelley, who is lovely (And also? Has a regrettable love of playing “Guess How Old Jen Is” in front of crowds). 

And as long as I have your attention… if you haven’t read Kelley Armstrong’s newest adult book, OMENS, you totally and completely should. Serial killers. The supernatural. Enough said, right?

YA!flash: Diversity in ALA's Best Fiction for Young Adults

diversityinya:

By Malinda Lo

Every January, the American Library Association releases the Best Fiction for Young Adults list. This list includes novels, short story collections, and novels in verse that were published in the past 16 months. These titles, according to the ALA, “are…

We’ll be reading this post (and many of Malinda’s other posts!) in my YA class this spring. I so appreciate the amount of work that goes into providing this kind of quantitative analysis (complete with GRAPHS) about the state of the industry—it’s an eye-opener.

(via sarahreesbrennan)

Anonymous asked: Hello! I know this might be strange (Considering it's not even OUT yet and all), but I was just wondering what books you read about psychology/body language in preparation for "The Naturals". Textbooks, maybe? That sort of thing is really interesting and I always wonder how writers study up to make such interesting AND believable books. Thanks!

I did two kinds of research to write THE NATURALS. The first falls under the category of what I like to call “research by living.” It’s basically the idea that rather than coming up with an idea for a book and THEN researching it, you have certain areas of expertise and interests, and ideas fall out of those pre-existing knowledge bases.

So, for example, back when I wrote THE SQUAD, I didn’t have to research competitive cheerleading because I’d been a competitive cheerleader. And when I wrote RAISED BY WOLVES, the pack structure and hierarchy and all of the animal behavior tidbits were greatly inspired by the fact that I’d spent several summers on an island full of monkeys, observing things like dominance hierarchies and violent challenges for dominance first hand.

Similarly, a large percentage of the research behind THE NATURALS was stuff I already knew before I came up with the idea of the book. I’ve always been fascinated by the way the mind works and have spent the past decade of my life researching that topic first-hand. I’ve got degrees in cognitive science, psychiatry, and psychology; I read and publish in psychology journals; I come up with theories and test them and actually run experiments.

So just by virtue of the fact that my day job is being a psychology professor, I had a lot of information rattling around in my head that made me want to write this book—the work of people like Paul Ekman (who studies universal emotions, facial expressions, micro expressions, and deception detecting) and Simon Baron-Cohen (one of my former advisors, who studies what he calls “empathizing” and “systemizing” abilities, that exist along a spectrum and may compete with each other for space in the brain). There’s a lot of really neat research out there on the psychology of different emotions (like, for instance, Paul Rozin’s research on disgust) and the physiological correlates of the ability to interpret emotions (for instance, there’s some really interesting stuff on the hormone oxytocin and emotion reading). And my PhD advisor, Paul Bloom, just published a new book on the developmental origins of good and evil, in which he discusses (among other things) psychopathy and moral emotions, so those are things that came up a lot in our lab. 

So. I had a pre-existing interest (and some knowledge of) the way our mind works and specifically, the domain of social cognition and theory of mind (or how we interpret the invisible mental states of others—which is one of the things I study as a scientist). So I had a pretty good basis going in for writing Michael’s ability, and Lia’s, and Sloane’s (which isn’t social, but which falls roughly under the heading of “systemizing,” which I talked briefly about above).

The ability that I really had to study up on was Cassie’s. Not only did I not have a prior background in criminal psychology or psychological profiling, I hadn’t really run into much research in cognitive science on how the average person builds personality models of people. (Although there is indeed some cool work on the topic).

Long story short, I actually did end up doing some more active researching to write THE NATURALS. One of my favorite books on the topic was MIND-HUNTER by John Douglas, an FBI agent who pioneered the discipline of criminal profiling. The book is part explanatory, part memoir, as Douglas walks us through some of his most high profile cases and explains how he (and the rest of the FBI) profiled them. I also read some textbook-like entries on profiling, and interviews with other profilers, and so on, but for me, the most helpful thing was the memoir-style pieces, since they actually took me inside the head of profilers.

The next challenge, of course, was combining what I’d learned about criminal profiling with what I knew about social cognition and how we view others to figure out how a person like Cassie, who naturally profiles everyone around her, would view the world. Of all the Naturals, hers was the only ability I had to be able to write from a first-person perspective, so I really had to spend a lot of time thinking about how her mind would work in even mundane situations.

Anonymous asked: Are you by chance making a sequel to "Every Other Day," because I feel there should be another book to it. P.S. I totally LOVED "Every Other Day," how it was written and EVERYTHING about it, so PLEASE think about writing a sequel. If you do I will rush to get it first thing.

I’m so glad you enjoyed Every Other Day! That book was so much fun to write. I spent most of the book thinking “Is this too crazy?” so it has been really gratifying to see readers who embrace the crazy plot twists and world building so fully!

In answer to your question, though, I have no plans for an EVERY OTHER DAY sequel at the moment. The book ends with Kali’s high school graduation, and you get just a hint at what her adult life might be like. I always meant for it to be a standalone, and for that last chapter to jump-start readers’ imaginations about what Kali’s future might be like. 

That said, if you like the idea of Kali (SPOILER ALERT for EOD…SPOILERS AHOY…) working with the FBI in a special unit devoted to preternatural crime, you might ALSO enjoy my new book, THE NATURALS, which comes out in November. It is also about a special unit in the FBI! In this case, it’s a unit that uses highly intelligent teenagers to profile and catch serial killers.

Like EVERY OTHER DAY, THE NATURALS has a variety of female characters (including one who, like Bethany, appears at first to be a pretty unlikely ally and another one that I think would get along really well with Skylar…). And, like EOD, it’s a book that was very much inspired by my love of science! Whereas Every Other Day was strongly influenced by the field of evolutionary biology, The Naturals is based largely on research in cognitive science and criminal psychology.